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lostinme

OCD-UK Member
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About lostinme

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Nottinghamshire
  • Interests
    Painting,jewellery making,writing poetry,sewing and anything artistic.

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  • OCD Status
    Sufferer

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  1. I always feel so low when I'm home alone :(

    1. Show previous comments  3 more
    2. taurean

      taurean

      The reasons behind why we think and feel the way we do are the real chains that bind us. 

      My neighbour, a woman just over 70 years old, says she misses having someone to share decision-making! Otherwise she manages fine. She cares for other's dogs while they are away and that gives her a focus and company, and she is a member of with one or two local clubs/societies, and has a few visitors. 

      So, ignoring the age issue, you being a lot younger, maybe you might look at what holds you back against how she manages, in her case quite happily, with hers probably a fair example of a relatively standard experience to measure against.

      Obviously OCD plays a big part for you. This might give a better understanding of where to focus your endeavours. 

    3. lostinme

      lostinme

      Thank you Roy for your kind words of support as always. This is a difficult one for me and even though OCD plays a part and magnifies things, it doesn't stem from being OCD related. 

      I realise this is something I need to address before my daughter goes off to uni and I'm home alone constantly, so even though it's not through choice being home alone,  it is good therapy wise. 

      Im unsure how to apply the same cbt method to this with it actually not being OCD related, so unsure how I can overcome this particular fear :(

    4. taurean

      taurean

       

      "Im unsure how to apply the same cbt method to this with it actually not being OCD related, so unsure how I can overcome this particular fear".

      It's a different CBT approach. You look at how rational or irrational the fear actually is. Look at whether your fear is based on something very unlikely to happen, and even then, you can take sensible steps to remove or at least well manage the risk behind the fear. 

      My wife has a fear of someone breaking in the house when I am not here. 

      She manages that small element of risk by the fact we have good security, and she makes sure everything is always locked when I am not here. 

      She accepts then that there is nothing more she can do, so switches off worry and rumination - because it would be pointless and achieve nothing - and gets on with whatever she wants to do. 

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