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Guest j julie

pure O?

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Guest j julie

Hi,

I have heard alot of people talking about pure O, but im not to sure what it is, how is it different to OCD?

thanks.

:help:

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Guest sylvia

Pure O is a type of ocd it's obsessive thoughts mostly with no rituals. For example you can have any thought if it distresses you and causes you anxiety it's probably ocd. Good luck

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Guest dubbs
Pure O is a type of ocd it's obsessive thoughts mostly with no rituals. For example you can have any thought if it distresses you and causes you anxiety it's probably ocd.  Good luck

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I think I had Pure-O. I used to have very disturbing thoughts but I had no rituals, this made me doubt I had OCD at all which made me worse for a while.

I got better after having CBT. I can still get bad thoughts (7 years later) but im able to deal with them.

take care

dubbs

:grin:

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Pure ‘O’

In the same way that compulsive drives can occur in the absence of obsessional thought, intrusive mental thoughts or images can also be experienced without any preceeding explicit compulsions - this is commonly referred to as pure ‘O’.

An example would be a person who suffers with distressing blasphemous thoughts but does not engage in any elaborate compulsive rituals (either overt or covert) tailored to neutralise or counter this distressing obsessive episode.

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Hi

I think it is worthwhile adding that a pure o sufferer does try to undo the tormented thought by thinking rationally or logically about the thought. The problem is that you cannot outlogic ocd and the more that you do this the intense the obsession actually becomes. At the risk of sounding boring to some of the longstanding board members you might want to check out www.ocfoundation.org who have an article by Steven Phillipson about pure o called thinking the unthinkable.

A lot of good coverage seems to be developing on here regarding the book The Imp of the Mind. I persoanlly did not find this book too helpful at first, but seeing so many positives written about it i think i will go back and re-read it.

Whatever you do best of luck with it, and let us know how you get on.

Adamski

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Just to second adamskis views on 'thinking the unthinkable'. As a 'pure o' this article just seemed to identify with all my ocd problems, and it was a feeling of 'yeh, thats me' all the way through the article. Again, not to dwell on the point, but if you have problems with pure o the article is a must read. The model on there also helped my understanding of the chemistry behind the obsessional thinking - which makes it easier to accept it is ocd.

matt

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Guest Kev P

I'm new to this site, but I've suffered from pure O for many years, only to have been diagnosed with depression until last year when I was finally properly diagnosed as having OCD (pure O). What a waste of so many years!

My question is having suffered for so long, is there any real positive way of controlling this torturous illness? What is the very best self-help book that can help? Is there anyone out there that can say they are cured or at least totally in control to the point that pure O does not control them?

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Hi Kev,

Welcome to the board. I'm sure you'll find it very helpful indeed. There are many sufferers here who are willing to give help and suport whenever they can.

In answer to your question about books, I would recommend 'The Imp of The Mind' by Lee Baer. It is a really good book for sufferers of pure 'o'. It goes a long way to explaiining obsessive thoughts.

I have suffered for many years from pure 'o' and was also diagnosed with depression at first. Now I am mostly able to control the thoughts rather than them control me although I do have setbacks.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy(CBT) or SSRI medication can help sufferers to get through this illness. Sometimes a combination of both. The person to help you with that is your GP who should be able to refer you to someone who can give you CBT. There is unfortunately a long waiting list for CBT on the NHS at the moment but it is one of the best ways to treat OCD.

Patsy x

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Welcome Kev,

I was also diagnosed with depression 4 years ago, only to stumble across an article on ocd and realise that i was a pure o sufferer. this tends to happen a lot with ocd. Hopefully, mediums like this site can continue the excellent work and raise awareness of the condition.

Im not sure of the right answers to your questions, but I think education on ocd will help immensely - i think the single most important thing i have learned is the fact that your thoughts cannot be worked out - it is impossible. Although it is so hard to do, accpeting your thoughts is the way to beat it.

On the best reading material, imp of the mind is especially good for pure o, as are the articles by dr.phillipson mentioned in the above thread. Brain Lock is my favourite book on ocd in general, as it explains the science behind it so well, and really helps in accepting that it is a disease.

You'll find the site very helpful......... :hug:

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Guest Kev P
Hi Kev,

Welcome to the board.  I'm sure you'll find it very helpful indeed.  There are many sufferers here who are willing to give help and suport whenever they can.

In answer to your question about books, I would recommend  'The Imp of The Mind' by Lee Baer. It is a really good book for sufferers of pure 'o'.  It goes a long way to explaiining obsessive thoughts.

I have suffered for many years from pure 'o' and was also diagnosed with depression at first.  Now I am mostly able to control  the thoughts rather than them control me although I do have setbacks. 

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy(CBT) or SSRI medication can help sufferers to get through this illness.  Sometimes a combination of both.  The  person to help you with that is your GP who should be able to refer you to someone who can give you CBT.  There is unfortunately a long waiting list for CBT on the NHS at the moment but it is one of the best ways to treat OCD.

Patsy x

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Guest Kev P

Hi Everyone,

Thanks for the very encouraging advice. I'm going to start my new challenges by purchasing the recommended books and by frequently reviewing this site. I think that one big aid is knowing that there are many people like ourselves out there, whereas not so long ago I personally felt that I was on my own and literally going mad!

If nothing more, it's a great relief to know that we are here to help each other and whatsmore, this type of site can keep everyone updated on the most latest of scientific progress on tackling this problem, although I'm sure that the eventual solution remains determination.

Please someone out there tell me, do you find tiredness & perhaps stress, say at work, tends to be a catalyst for making these thoughts worsen? If so is it not a viscious circle, because keeping occupied is one aid, yet doing too much can make matters worse. Somewhat of a roller coaster ride!!!

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