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hedvig

Bulletin Board User
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  • OCD Status
    Sufferer

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  • Gender
    Female
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    Sweden

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  1. hedvig

    Psychiatric Consultation

    No wonder when you are paying so much attention to not thinking about it. Also, worrying about the job like you do is clearly anxiety driven. Like you have swapped one worry to another. That is not a state you should have to be in. It is possible to deal with the anxiety, which is the real issue here.
  2. hedvig

    Psychiatric Consultation

    I wrote about acceptance of thoughts just now in another thread so thought I could paste it in here too. Don’t know if you will think it is useful but to me it has been a good metaphore when understanding how to practice acceptance of my thoughts. I learned to picture my mind as a living room with a big door. All thoughts were welcome as guests to my room, I decided not to guard the door to my room but instead let every guest (read thought) in without judging them no matter how they were dressed or what they looked like. I pictured myself sitting somewhere in my room observing my guests without judgement. Then I allowed them to leave whenever they wanted. So in your case, it would be more of a recognition like ”Oh, there’s that thought again”, ”Right now my mind is filled with these thoughts”, ”That thought is really similar to that one”. Sort of just like studying them with curiosity instead of judging them. It definitely doesn’t mean you have to categorize them as true or false.
  3. You don’t have to classify. You could sit there, see that girl, have the thought that she was attractive no matter what age she was. Everything that followed from there was fuelled by OCD.
  4. Be careful not to fall into ruminations about this again. You do not have to go over this more now. You fear it is not OCD because that would mean your other fears are true, but you don’t have to figure it out any more.
  5. It’s so comforting talking to others that understand the mechanisms, even if the worries we have differ. It is always easier to give advice to others. That’s why we need to always treat ourselves like our own best friend. But it is also very good to know there are other people out there to turn to that will understand. This is a great community!
  6. You are right. What a good learning experience it was.
  7. I know, it is so easy to get trapped in new worries when OCD has us in a hold. We just have to keep pushing forward and use all tools in our toolbox. You can do it!
  8. Acceptance of your thoughts are key, but because of the distress they caused you your mind quickly went into rumination mode. Next time, try to shift focus back and cut the rumination. Distance yourself from the thoughts, look at them with curiosity. ”Oh, now that thought came to my mind again!”, ”Interesting”, ”How funny”. Treat them like clouds that move on the sky, they come and they go - we don’t judge them. I learned to picture my mind as a living room with a big door. All thoughts were welcome as guests to my room, I decided not to guard the door to my room but instead let every guest (read thought) in without judging them no matter how they were dressed or what they looked like. I pictured myself sitting somewhere in my room observing my guests without judgement. Then I allowed them to leave whenever they wanted. I don’t know if it makes sense to you but this metaphore has helped me.
  9. Hi njb, sorry to hear you’re feeling like this right now. It seems like you get a lot of intrusive thoughts about feared attractions that really distress you. In order to relieve yourself from the distress that these thoughts cause you, you perform compulsions. You ruminate over their age, scan their apperances for reassurance that they are not under aged, check by asking them, replay events in your mind. It’s OCD. Intrusions, distress, compulsions. What can you do to help yourself in this case?
  10. hedvig

    Just wanted to say...

    You shouldn’t try to stop thinking about it. Let it in. Accept. Don’t wait eagerly for it to shift.
  11. hedvig

    Just wanted to say...

    Thanks for asking, I’m doing well. Will go back to work in a couple of weeks after my maternity leave which kind of stresses me but trying to take one day at a time. I totally relate to what you write about exercise. Exercise improves my mood so much. It’s really difficult to get going when feeling low though, but sticking to a routine no matter what is good for me. My anxiety always gets worse when I’m not exercising, when my routines are changed and I have a lot of time to do nothing. My summer holidays (I work as a teacher, so always have long summer breaks) used to be horrendous but I can now manage quite well. It’s been really hot here too but cooler in the evenings. Boxing works too for me, and body pump!
  12. hedvig

    Just wanted to say...

    The same with this passage. Stop paying attention to thoughts about recovery, if you’ll be like this for the rest of your life etc. Let those thoughts pass too. Tell yourself that ’maybe, maybe not - we’ll see about that’. Right now you are learning to deal with the anxiety and worries, and it will continue to be beneficial for you throughout life.
  13. hedvig

    Just wanted to say...

    I can identify many compulsions in your previous posting. Continually searching for evidence that this might be OCD, checking your mood, ruminating (yes, if it’s still there in your thoughts for most part of the day - I dare to say there’s still some rumination going on), avoidance of threads about cheating. I feel like I’m nagging but I think it would be good for you to tell yourself that it doesn’t matter what tomorrow will be like, or how long it will take for you to get better. You will get there eventually. If you keep checking how you’re feeling and panic over not getting well it will keep you in a distressed state. If you tell yourself that tomorrow is going to be awful and that you dread waking up, there is a very small chance you will wake up happy. Tell yourself that yes, you might feel bad and this will most likely be the first thing that comes to your mind, but when it does - accept it and welcome it. Then get on with your day. How did the running go by the way?
  14. hedvig

    Just wanted to say...

    I really think you should do as your partner suggests. Get out there, do stuff. Even if you feel like you don’t want to do anything. Do not try to find any answers to why you thought this or that, you have got to let those thoughts just be there without responding to them. Tell yourself that the thoughts can be there as much as they want, OCD can do its worst - you’re still going out with your partner. OCD can tag along if it wants, invite it in.
  15. hedvig

    Help!

    Sorry to hear you’re struggling at the moment Skullpops! Try to remember that it is natural to have ups and downs, be kind to yourself. Don’t judge yourself for falling into negative thinking patterns, try to tell yourself it is okay to feel like this now but that it will pass and in the meantime you will act like your own best friend and take care of yourself. I know this is so difficult when the anxiety is high and OCD is taking over, but that’s the time we need it the most. Hugs to you, you’ve got this!
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