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Ashley

Quite Interesting Facts

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Taken from today's Quite Interesting Twitter post to get us started.

Forty is the only number in English whose letters are in alphabetical order.

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The two closest league football grounds in England are Nottingham Forest and Notts County separated only by the River Trent and a small road. *  You can click here to see a Google Map image from the Trent End of the famous City Ground and look across the river to see the Magpies ground sticking out.

* Well was until those idiots across the Trent got themselves relegated out of the football league last season.

Also quite interesting, but probably not very is the fact that technically Notts County are in the city of Nottingham and Forest are in the county. 

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Notts County are they the oldest professional football club in England? I have been to their meadow lane ground a good few years ago. Never been to the city ground home of Forest.

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Just now, Avo said:

Notts County are they the oldest professional football club in England? I have been to their meadow lane ground a good few years ago. Never been to the city ground home of Forest.

They were, but since their relegation Stoke and a few others have been trying to nab the title. 

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Dundee and Dundee united in Scotland are very close too - think just a street width apart. Dens park and Tannardice. 

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I'm not sure which English clubs would now be closer, Liverpool/Everton perhaps?

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I think they possibly would be. I know they are pretty close, Stanley park separates them. So maybe a 1/4 mile  between the two grounds ? Other cities with 2 or more professional clubs I am not sure about how close the grounds are to each other. 

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45 minutes ago, Avo said:

Other cities with 2 or more professional clubs

As a north Londoner for a while I do know it's not Spurs and Arsenal.  It's not Sheffield Utd/Wed either, or Man City/UTD. I have not been to the Bristol's, but not sure they're close either (TeZ might know)..    Chelsea and Fulham and QPR might all be close, I would have to check but suspect you're right about Liverpool/Everton with Stanley Park separating. 

 

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Hey Guys

Bristol's two league clubs - City and Rovers, are around 5 miles apart across the city.  Bristol City are actually based right at the old exit to the city on the road to Weston-Super-Mare.  Rovers are - after decades of uncertainty - located in the North Bristol suburbs.  The teams divide the city down the middle - Northerners prefer Rovers, the South is City Country.  I have never particularly cared for either!  There is a third club, Bristol Manor Farm which plays in the Western League and is based in North West Bristol.  

:)

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Cleopatra (51 BC - 30 BC) lived closer to today than when the Great Pyramid of Giza was built (2580 BC ~ 2560 BC)

Speaking of the pyramids, wooly mammoths were still around (though not in Egypt) when the pyramids were built, they didn't go extinct until as late as 1650 B.C.

You can travel from Norway to North Korea passing through only one foreign country, Russia.  I wouldn't recommend it though!

The name for this symbol # is octothorp

The name for the plastic bit at the ends of shoelaces is aglet

One more name related fact, the longest place name in the US is Lake Chargoggagoggmanchauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg in Massachusetts.  Thats 46 letters long.  

November 1, 2000 was the last day every human being alive was on earth.  Since November 2, 2000 there has always been someone on board the International Space Station.

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1 hour ago, dksea said:The name for the plastic bit at the ends of shoelaces is aglet

I was told it was a “flugelbinder” but I just looked it up and you are right whereas the term I heard is not.

Nice bunch of facts there dksea.

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11 hours ago, dksea said:

November 1, 2000 was the last day every human being alive was on earth.  Since November 2, 2000 there has always been someone on board the International Space Station.

Oh that is quite interesting. 

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19 hours ago, Tez said:

Bristol's two league clubs - City and Rovers, are around 5 miles apart across the city.

Thanks Tez, we can rule them out of this little game then. :)

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Quite Interesting Fact
The 999 service was launched in London on this day 83 years ago (30 June 1937). It was the world's first emergency phone number.

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6 minutes ago, Ashley said:

The 999 service was launched in London on this day 83 years ago (30 June 1937). It was the world's first emergency phone number.

I wonder how much more often they get accidental dials compared to services in other countries which don't use the same digit 3 times (911 in the US, 119 here in Japan, etc.). At lot easier for a kid to accidentally dial the same digit multiple times :D

 

 

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Cleopatra (51 BC - 30 BC) lived closer to today than when the Great Pyramid of Giza was built (2580 BC ~ 2560 BC)

Speaking of the pyramids, wooly mammoths were still around (though not in Egypt) when the pyramids were built, they didn't go extinct until as late as 1650 B.C.

I think it's amazing to reflect on the fact that by the time the Romans annexed Egypt, the civilization was already ancient.  

I had read that Woolly Mammoths survived on one of the arctic islands off the coast of Siberia until well into the Bronze Age.  

My fact:  The first advertisement on ITV when it started in 1955 was for "SR Toothpaste".  :)

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Some fun facts about blood 💉

India (39.93%), Pakistan (37.97%),  and Bangladesh (35.54%) are the only countries in the world where the B blood type is the most common.

Bangladesh (17.49%), North Korea (11.35%),  and South Korea (11.00%) are the only countries where greater than 10% of the population have type AB.  Japan is an honorable mention with 9.95%.  So close!

85.5% of the population of Chile are O+, by far the highest concentration of one type in any country.

Meanwhile the rarest blood type, AB- is rarest of all in Zimbabwe, only 0.01% of the population have this scarce blood type.

A red blood cell is about 7 microns in size.  A micron is 1 millionth of a meter.  So you'd need to line up 142,857 red blood cells to equal 1 meter.

The blood of the horseshoe crab (which is not actually a crab) is blue!  The reason is that their blood uses a protein called hemocyanin, which contains copper, rather than the more common hemoglobin, which contains iron, to transport oxygen.

Blood makes up about 7~8% of your body weight.

Australian James Harrison holds the record for most blood donations in the world at 1173 times.  He has a rare (perhaps unique) blood plasma composition that can be used to treat Rhesus Disease, a disease that can develop due to blood type mismatches between mothers and babies.  His donations are estimated to have saved over 2.4 million babies from the effects of this disease.

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The unicorn is the national animal of Scotland. 🦄 

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Ear wax.  The blood facts got me thinking about ear wax..... apparently,  people of European or African ancestry tend to have yukky, gooey ear wax.  East Asian people tend to have dry. flaky ear wax.  Apparently, genetic researchers have studied the ear wax type distribution to determine how anatomically modern humans moved out of their ancestral homelands in East Africa and populated the rest of the world.  

Music facts:  The first record played on BBC Radio One (when the Beeb introduced their own pop music station, in 1967) was "Flowers in the Rain" by the Move.  The Move was led by Roy  Wood who is most famous for "I Wish it Could be Christmas Everyday" by his subsequent band, Wizzard.  A great record, but it is trotted out every year.  

The final record played on Radio Luxembourg, the great pan continental station that was for my parents in the forties and fifties the only pop music outlet in English, on 31st December 1992, was "Maybe the Morning" by Marion Montgomery.  A version by Sunny (from the Brotherhood of Man) had been used to close the station every night during the seventies and eighties.  

We are used to pop music videos being everywhere now - MTV has been on the air for forty years.  The last UK number one single for which no official music video was ever made was "Move Closer" by Phyllis Nelson (1985).  

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The word for silver and money is the same in 14 languages.

For example, in Thai, เงิน (ngern) can mean both silver and money. The same goes for Cantonese where 銀 (ngan) can mean silver and money.

This alludes to the fact that in the old days, silver coins were used as currency for day to day transactions.

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Here is how the city of Newcastle acquired its name. 

Having defeated Malcolm in Lothian in the autumn of 1080, Robert, son of William the conqueror, returned home via Monkchester where a wooden castle was built to fortify the area and ensure that its advantageous position as the main crossing point of the River Tyne remained under Norman control. The area was then called Novum Castellum, meaning ‘New Castle’ and a castle has remained on the site ever since. The stone Castle Keep which still remains today was built by Henry II between 1172-1177. The main gatehouse, known as the Black Gate, was built by Henry III between 1247-1250.

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The football club I supported as a teenager, Coventry City, has just won - in the curtailed season - promotion to the Championship, despite having to play their home games this season at Birmingham City, quite a trek for the supporters. 

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The word for silver and money is the same in 14 languages.

Yes St Mike, the Welsh word "silver" and "cash" is arian.  

:Wales:

In Cornish - which of course, is related to Welsh, and not nearly so well spoken - the word for "silver" and "cash" is arghans.  

Tez 😄

 

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